Skip to main content

tv   America Tonight  Al Jazeera  January 21, 2014 12:00am-1:01am EST

12:00 am
cheating. unusual results appeared on test scores, revealed by the school reform commission. those are the headlines, america tonight is next. can you always get the latest news on aljazeera.com. i will see you back here tomorrow night. boundary hopping can and do parents really go to jail for stealing education? >> handcuffed with a leather belt. >> with handcuffs. >> we went in jail. >> also tonight, more to come. new threats for tourists coming to the winter olympics. why there's reason to stay away from sochi.
12:01 am
and mud cat, sweet lou, so many greats. the american treasures who came after jackie robinson. on an era of pain, how a few good hits could level the playing field. >> why the blackball players attack that ball, you guys would simply attack it, simple, it was white! >> and good evening, thanks for joining us. i'm joie chen. when it comes to improving this country's public education, there are endless headlines about charter programs and districts that offer open enrollment for anyone who want to be there.
12:02 am
but for school choice movement the simple reality is that hundreds of thousands of students remain trapped in failing school districts because of their zip codes. as what "america tonight"'s special correspond soledad o'brien found out, illegallily enrolling in districts they don't belong in. >> it's 730 in the morning and jack larkin is getting ready to go to school. >> you need to do your writing journal. >> i did. >> your philosophy journal too? >> i did. >> jack and his parents live in milbourn, new jersey, some of the poorest neighborhoods in the state. luckily, his school system is one of the state's best. >> how about one of these
12:03 am
nice green apples? >> have it for snack. >> jack's mom stephanie has a personal and professional stake on the millburn schools. >> three bedrooms possibly four. >> she is one of the stop real estate agents in town and knows the schools are the selling point of the neighborhood. >> the suburbs are all about the elementary schools. i love you, bye. >> there are five elementary schools a middle school and millburn high school which consistently ranks as one of the stop performing schools of the country. a 90% graduation rates, juniors and seniors passing advance placement test. >> a great commute, a fantastic community and an excellent school system. it's really the three things that most people are looking for when they're shopping for a home
12:04 am
for their family. >> the schools are technically public. but the price of admission to live in this tony township is a whopping $1.3 million. that's the average sale price of a home here. average real estate taxes run around $20,000 a year. there are some lower price rentals but no officially designated affordable housing in millburn. >> the way the works in new jersey, you go to school within your zip code. >> lorna is author of the blowing nj left behind. >> any parent -- blog nj left behind. >> any kid would want to be enrolled in millburn. they have enormous access to their academic interests in all sorts of ways. >> a few miles down the road it's a different story.
12:05 am
>> if you live ten miles away from millburn say in north new jersey, then you might go to bering jer hig areer hig er high school, 56% graduation rate. almost no ap courses. most of the kids fail to reach proficiency in language arts and math and the reason those kids go to berger beringer, is because they fail in math. they are stuck. they cannot go to another public school? >> no. >> and that seems to me so hellaciously unfair. >> not everyone is stuck. new jersey does have charter
12:06 am
schools and an interdistrict transfer program for a small number of students. less than 3% of the total. and the high performing school districts want to protect their borders. after all, it's mostly their local property taxes that are paying for the schools. >> schools try to the vigilant about creating a registration system that confirms that the children who are enrolled in the schools actually live in the district. because the people who live in a wealthy district are funding the education? >> they are personally funding the schools. it all comes on the backs of those taxpayers. so if you say well, there's a kid from newark who's trying to being sneak in, we are not going to pay for that kid. he doesn't live here. >> private investigator jimmy knows the extremes that schools
12:07 am
will go to to keep students out. he has launched his business on it. in response to the growing number of school districts that were reaching out to him to make sure all their students lived where they said they did. if a kind of suburban border patrol, from his surveillance van equipped with a secret pair periscope. he has tracked hundreds of students. >> how does it work? walk me through the process. does a school reach out to you and say we have a suspicion about a student? >> the school will reach out to me and they'll say we would like to you do an audit of the student roster. they'll run the student names through database but it might often come back as totally out of district, out of town, out of state. in new jersey we had a case where the students actually lived in pennsylvania or new york and we would be able to identify the kids.
12:08 am
>> there aren't any statistics on how many students are enrolled in districts outside of where they liver. they don't track that data but there are more than 500 school districts in this state and because in many cases there are poorly performing schools blocks away from highly performing schools, border-hopping happens all the time. >> it's very common for a hundred student every year to confront them, have residency officers that will confront the parent and say look, you don't live in the district, you have to register in the school district you actually belong to. >> how do you feel like in theory, everybody's school district should be equivalent, right? >> as an investigator i don't get involved in why people are doing what they're doing. basically they're breaking the
12:09 am
law. >> as an educator, it is a little more complicated. >> something i struggle with. >> he's a teacher in bergen county. >> as a teacher we know what we should do right? but as a superintendent we have stakeholders that we are responsible for. >> how much of your budget leer come from the taxes of the people who live in this district? >> roughly 90%. >> have you hired a private investigator before? >> we have. we've had to and it breaks your heart to do that but you know there's 5,000 community members that you are responsible for and you have the ultimate responsibility, as a superintendent. and as an educator that's the part that drives your heart. >> in ohio, pennsylvania and five other states plus washington, d.c, boundary hoppers can be charge criminally for theft of educational services and wind up serving time.
12:10 am
>> i never thought that i would go to jail for lying about my zip code. >> when we return, parents, locked up for stealing an educational. education. >> also ahead in our program. hardball in the civil rights era. mud cat grant and sweet lou johnson on deck in our american treasure series. two who broke the color line on the baseline and why their history protect the history of all of us. >> we somehow got to maintain a certain type of scenario where these guys are brought forth all the time. that's why i have all of these pictures in here. because >> everyday... at the us - mexican border, someone dies... >> two hours in, we come up on a body >> now, in a breakthough television event, al jazeera america takes you
12:11 am
beyond the debate. experience first hand the tragic journey of these migrants. >> a lot of people don't have a clue what goes on when you live near the border. >> six strangers with different points of view... >> i don't believe in borders... >> our government is alowing an invasion... >> get to experience illegal immigration. up close and personal... >> it's very overwhelming to see this many people that have perished... >> a lot of families that don't know where their babies went... >> i wanna make sure her life, it's remembered... >> what happens when lost lives are re-lived? >> the only way to find out is to see it yourselves... >> on... the borderland... only on al jazeer america >> hey guys wanna come to the united states?
12:12 am
>> and welcome back. before the break our "america tonight" special correspondent soledad o'brien reported on boundary hopping. that's a phenomenon when
12:13 am
families sneak their kids out of the districts into good schools. sol ada o'brien introduces us to parents who suffer serious penalties for doing it. >> kelly is a 43-year-old mother and teacher's aide. she was also a convicted felon. she went to jail in 2011 for illegally enrolling her children in a school district. >> i had issues around my neighborhood. i had a prowler who broke into our home. i talked to my father about it. he said send them to our school. you're here all the time anyway so -- >> was it done to sneak it in? did you know i'm putting an address where i don't live? >> right. i've been working for a school system for many years so i knew of a lot of students who did the same thing.
12:14 am
>> find an address, put it down right? >> it wasn't like i just found it, it wasn't like burger king's address it was my dad's address. he lived in the township and i lived in the city. we literally lived five minutes away from each other. >> and they had better schools? >> yes, the township had better schools. she loved the schools. >> her daughter was enrolled in copley, fairlon. >> we had a computer lab, garden outside many our own greenhouse. and i was so grateful to have been able to go there for just two years. >> so tell me how you were caught. >> well, they -- what i understand is they had an investigator from cleveland area i think, and woe come down and he would -- he would come down and he would watch my
12:15 am
whereabouts like he would watch me go to and fro. and he came to the conclusion stating that they had clear and convincing evidence that i did not live or reside in copley. >> she withdrew her children in school and enrolled them back in akron. >> it was a huge difference. it was huge. we didn't learn that much. there was a lot of disruptive -- it was disruptive in classes, there was no resources, it was just completely different and i felt like i wasn't learning anything at all. >> williams bolar was surprised she says when 18 months later she was indicted. >> what were the charges? >> grand theft which was the money and signing -- >> forgery? >> forkary. >> the judge said she wanted to send a message to others like her. >> i had the swabbing of the mouth, i had
12:16 am
the finger printing. >> who was taking care of your daughters? >> the irony of all it was my father. he had to watch them, he had to many care for them. >> in the district they were never in? >> right. >> a petition to free her went viral and ohio's governor john kasick pardoned her. >> i wouldn't have done it. i didn't believe i would go to jail for lying about my drenls. there are so many reasons why a parent would want to take their child out of that district into another district. >> elicia andham let garcia were also charged theft of services or stealing and education. >> we got handcuffs like criminals with leather belts.
12:17 am
we went in jail, we spent a couple hours in jail. >> ham let garcia, an immigrant, married elicia, a ukrainian grant in 2008. they moved in elicia's father, a homeowner in nearby montgomery county. theorella enrolled in a school district. they decided to let fe isorella finish the school in grandfather's school district. that's when the trouble began. >> the school district contacted us in april, said there's a problem with your residency. so we came in to meet with the principal. >> and what happened? >> she kept insisting that i never lived there. and she's turning us to the
12:18 am
police. >> the superintendent wouldn't talk to us. but she made good on her threat and turned the case over to police. the garcias said they were cooperating, showing mail, alicia's voter registration saying she lived in montgomery county. >> we didn't hear anything for a month and then in august, he called us and said that we have a choice to turn ourselves in or he putting out a warrant to arrest us. >> what was going through your mind while they were finger printing you and processing you? >> disgusted, disgusting to everything in my head because -- >> i didn't believe this is actually happening in america over education. a five-year-old child. and i pleaded with superintendent, i said look, we're good parents. we're good citizens.
12:19 am
i'm a business owner, you know, i never did anything, i always you know walked a straight line. >> the garci garcias turned themselves in. the trial is set for next week. in a criminal complaint the different allegation the garcias stole $10,000 tuition, a felony, punish able, by one year in prison. false information about their residency. in pennsylvania, as in all states, school districts get some federal and state funding. but property taxes are the primary source for funding public schools. the gap between rich and poor school districts is so vast, that the state earned a d on the national report card on school funding. that report card is put out by the education law center in new
12:20 am
jersey. >> there would be an argument from a school that would say listen, we fund this school with taxpayer money. some state and some federal funds. but the people in the community pay for this school that's in this county. so you're not from here. you don't get to attend. >> i can answer the argument. first of all my wife did live on that street. >> my father is a taxpayer who owns the house there. >> and i believe every children should have access to quality education. the economy the socioeconomic status everyone. >> and your school district is somewhere else, not in montgomery county. >> i answer her that is wrong, we are a member of the same state, actually, same country. do not treat me like an illegal alien because i live in philadelphia. >> but you should stay in
12:21 am
philadelphia, where you are paying taxes. >> if you are a person who doesn't have the money to live in montgomery county, that is not your fault that you can't make the same money, okay? >> is the school in your neighborhood in philadelphia, is that school unsafe? >> it is safe. they passed the ayp, the no child left behind law. >> the d.a. cancelled a planned interview with us. but the garcias think they are a test case. the moreland school district are, so far the only family being prosecuted is the garcias. >> the garcia family to make an example, to make sure everybody in philadelphia, this can happen to you. >> this is an interesting phrase
12:22 am
you used, across the border. >> that's the phrase they use . canada. >> there is a line they don't want people to cross. >> our special correspondent, soledad o'brien joins us. is there a likelihood that this woman will go to jail? >> there is a possibility the garcias could go to uranium. i jail. if you value that education as $10,000, it could be possible that they will spend a year in jail. some people will say they should get to probation. the case goes to court on the 28th. you never know. >> what about other families involved in this? >> there were ten other families had had a similar situation. the garcias said we are being targeted. what about the other ten families?
12:23 am
we are told that the families worked out a deal, they paid the tuition. the garcias say we have offered to pay back what we owe and we were rebuffed. that detail on which they are opposite sides, if they were able to work it out for these ten families what exactly happened in the garcias case we'll have to find out. >> that opposite up a broader question, how many are involved in this kind of thing? could there be a whole lot more? >> yes, i think there's a lot. we know it's in the thousands and when you talk to superintendents of certain districts they'll say when they did their canvassing of their roles, in fact in some cases they had to ask 200 students to leave. so in a place like new jersey where you're spending roughly $18,000 per kid that's serious money. there's one or two kids every so
12:24 am
often, sometimes they don't have any at all. it depends what border you're actually talking about. but in some districts it is a huge number and ultimately it goes to the bigger problem, inequity in education, which philosophically theoretically should be the same for every student who is in public school but in practicality and in reality it is really not. >> you hear that in the washington area we hear this so often. but think of i.t. districts are trying to control their costs in all this, i'm sure there's a need for taxpayers to think look you are supposing to take what the education system gives you. what is the solution? i mean aside from let's really making all the schools fair and how practical is that? twhas solution here? >> -- what's the solution here? >> yeah, it's a tough thing. there are some programs where the schools can opt in to take some students. but at the end of the day, when taxpayers are footing the bill
12:25 am
for, say, 98% of the cost, there is a sense from some people in town that listen, we actually pay for the overwhelming amount of tuition and we should limit who has access to it. they are sometimes spending a lot of money on a school that is just less good. they want access to other things. i think and most of the people you talk to say it's not a small fix obviously but it really is a fix that involves how do we feel about reform in education? it is really a massive problem. how do you make it equal for every student no matter what school they are attending? how do you possibly allow students from one district to access another district? new jersey mass a very tiny limited program and i think it's a matter of a bigger question, what do we value in public education? it supposed to be fair across the board? once you answer that big
12:26 am
questioning question, you can look for solutions. there's no big solution on the horizon i think. >> "america tonight"'s special correspondent soledad o'brien. thanks so much soledad. >> you bet. >> we're makin taking a look at what's on "america tonight" tomorrow. the risks for some children, their education and even their safety. >> parents should have a right to oversee their children's education. parents should not decide whether or not a child gets an education. right now laws around the country when it comes to home schooling generally do not reflect that. i think a failing home school should be handled like any other school, it should be shut down. and right now there's no method to do that.
12:27 am
>> sheila macvicar brings us a story on home schooling. that's tuesday on "america tonight". connect with us at our website, aljazeera.com/americatonight. coming up after the break tonight, security at sochi. the new video raising concern consider this. the news of the day plus so much more. answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what.
12:28 am
canada. this is goin
12:29 am
>> now, a snapshot of stories making headlines on "america tonight". following up on that enormous fire near los angeles we told you about last week. 3700 people were evacuated, 2,000 acres blackened and add least five homes were destroyed. the long est standing detainee in north korea kenneth bae spoke, and accused of using his tour business to build antigovernment groups. and bown day fo up and downr iran.
12:30 am
in exchange for stopping nuclear enrichment activities, it got some of its withhold capital returned. but tehran wouldn't agree for all of the conditions for the talks and so had its invitation to montreux revoked. direct warning to tourists to stay away. security has been a big concern throughout runup of the sochi games, especially after last month's bombings in volgograd. concerned. this is the video that sparked new fears. it features two men who claim to be behind the new year's twin bombings in volgograd that killed at least 20 people. the men in the video appear to
12:31 am
have explosives and warn of a surprise package for tourists unless the russian government cancels the winter olympic games. the show goes on. the olympic torch arrived in volgograd, on its way to sochi, 400 miles south. security forces flooded into the seaside community that will be the home of the winter games. vladimir putin insistin insists the games will be safe. >> the briefings i've received from the intelligence community to the fbi i know there are indications that there's serious concerns and we need to do a lot to step up security. we have 15,000 americans traveling osochi for olympics and i want to do everything i can to make sure it's a safe olympic. >> other lawmakers including maine senator angus king say
12:32 am
most likely they would stay away. >> i would not go and i don't think i would send my family. >> so how great is the risk? we're joined now by errol suthers, appreciate you being here. and we want to say you have quite a bit of familiarity with these big sporting events. you were recently in brazil and looking for the world cup and the olympic events there coming up so you have seen a lot of these facilities and these sort of circumstances. what do you think of the preparation for sochi? 30,000 extra forces going in there to help. will it be enough to make a difference here? >> well, joie thank you for having me. what is quite interesting about this scenario are the articulated threats by a known terrorist organization and their
12:33 am
demonstrated ability to carry these out. you had the caucasus emirates who being articulated these threats. you have to land in moscow or st. petersburg, and what they are looking at are the transportation hubs that will be moving people from the airports to the games. we have a very interesting scenario of approaching games and a known threat and incidents that occurred already, as was mentioned, thousands of americans that will be there and the requirement for us to have permission from the russian government to do anything if evacuations are necessary. >> what about, though, the tourists, the support, the family, the friends? i think it's one thing to say we can secure the athletes themselves, we can secure the coaches, they are going to be in limited and controlled facilities. but what about the tourists
12:34 am
themselves, what is the concern for them that is different? >> specifically identified tourists as the targets. and the tourists have to be if you will aware of and cognizant of the same things they have all over the world. unattended bags, people lurking standing around perhaps surveilling. i think if you reverse engineer the kind of threats that adversaries do, if tourists do have to be concerned they have to pay attention and follow instructions and really just hope that the appropriate security measures are in place and will be very effective. >> these circumstances though as we know you do have familiarity in china before those olympics, in brazil most recently, looking at the world cup facilities which are coming up quite quickly and then brazil will hold its olympics as well. but russia is going to be a
12:35 am
different situation isn't it? the difficulties they face in russia with these groups is different in china and brazil now, the political differences. >> it is disht. in china we have a situation where a number of people were at least detaped before the games. they too like russia assigned large numbers of government troops onto the games to protect them. in brazil we have an added issue now of the population that's revolting against or protesting against living wages. they're protesting against the lack of transportation and other infrastructure. but russia is quite different. you have the trifecta of threats, human rights which has arguably been challenged in russia with most recently the pussy riot rock band and greenpeace, we do have protest that take place. gay rights issue, we are sending openly gay representatives from
12:36 am
the united states and president putin says he wants to see politics and sports stay ra separate but that's interesting. although the footprint of these games are smaller than the other two eventual you as i've looked at, you still have to go to and from the games, have security force necessary place. and winter clothing is different than summer clothing. >> a senator saying look, i wouldn't go, what would you do if you had tickets if you were interested, would you go? >> if i had tickets i would go. i believe that first of all, near going to have appropriate security measures in place. however the russians have to understand the command and control of everybody and everything does not equal a zero risk of an attack. but i think you'll see a very heavily protected games, i think you'll see a successful games
12:37 am
but i do believe we need to the wary. but if i had tickets to be there i'd be there supporting our country. >> errol southers, thank you very much for being with us. >> thank you joie. >> on the holiday of martin luther king jr, we reflect on how much now is reality.
12:38 am
consider this: the news of the
12:39 am
day plus so much more. >> we begin with the government shutdown. >> answers to the questions no one else will ask. >> it seems like they can't agree to anything in washington no matter what. >> antonio mora, award winning and hard hitting. >> we've heard you talk about the history of suicide in your family. >> there's no status quo, just the bottom line. >> but, what about buying shares in a professional athlete? >> honoring the memory of dr. martin luther king, jr. on this holiday that commemorates his life. it's hard to believe he would have been 85 this year. we have noted it's been half a century since dr. king gave his iconic speech. but for millions of americans his dream of equality, employment and equity is very much in complete.
12:40 am
tw20 years after his assassination is about $19,000. the most recent study of that gap shows that it's actually widened over the last 40 years. what would he say about the struggles america continues to face today? i spoke with dr. king's eldest son, and his namesake, martin luther king iii. >> he and my mom dedicated part of their lives by eradicating the triple evils. the evil of poverty, the evil of racism and the evil of militarism and violence. in race we've made strides but we still have a lot of work to do. but poverty has probably changed dramatically or in a dynamic way over the next 30 years. in '68 we had about 21 million people living in poverty.
12:41 am
today almost 60 million and the numbers are growing. so we've got some big challenges. and the final thing is militarism and war are at ep tellic levels. -- epidemic levels. there are those that feel that the programs of social uplift have failed. but going on when we look at violence in communities, we are not doing a about job addressing violence. we created a culture of violence. we've somehow got to find a way to create a culture of nonviolence to challenge us to a higher ideal and level. >> you know it strikes me we are getting prepared now for next week, the president giving the state of the union address and these are the very subjects we understand he expects to take on. the issues of income and equality, of joblessness. these are still as difficult and
12:42 am
intractable as they were in your father's time. this has to be a disappointment not only to his legacy but to all of us as we look at this. >> well, i certainly believe that it is -- it is spoig. spoig -- disappointing largely because we are better than the behavior we are exhibiting. when congress works together and forge an agenda to move forward, i don't believe there is any problem that exists that we cannot solve. we have the ability as a negate to resolve just about anything. we just have to identify the will. when ability and will meet then it yields results. >> in the final months before his passing, he was talking so much about the poor people's march, he was talking about demonstrating on their behalf on the efforts to uplift those parts of the community that were not being sof
12:43 am
snostled our world to -- solved in our world, to bring jobs to those people. his speech was about that difficult issue. i wonder what we could do to honor his memory now to make those things happen to actually get to resolution there? >> well i think firm you're absolutely correct in 1968, in some communities we've moved the minimum wage up. but dad was talking about a living wage in 1968. so he was way ahead of his time. in a real sense. and we certainly have not gotten there yet. one of the things we do this past weekend people have been involved and today in community service activities across our nation. hundreds of thousands to millions of people. and that is wonderful. but we cannot just be engaged on one day. we have to be engaged every week, every month. from a week to a month, from a month to a year. if we're to engage in some kind
12:44 am
of community service of 100 million plus people then we'll begin to see some changes. and the other thing is, in school systems we have to teach our children about entrepreneurship. we got to create more businesses and find a way to capitalize those businesses so they can be sustained. because most jobs are with small and developing businesses, not the large large corporations. what the large large corporations, it really is the small and developing business that keeps our economy going. >> martin luther king iii, honoring your father's memory and continuing that community service as well, we thank you for being with us. >> thank you for the opportunity. >> and ahead on our final thoughts on this evening, a great american pastime
12:45 am
al jazeera america gives you the total news
12:46 am
12:47 am
al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of
12:48 am
the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. on al jazeera america
12:49 am
al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ...
12:50 am
to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. on al jazeera america al jazeera america gives you the total news experience
12:51 am
anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. on al jazeera america
12:52 am
al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of
12:53 am
the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. on al jazeera america
12:54 am
al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ...
12:55 am
to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life. on al jazeera america al jazeera america gives you the total news experience
12:56 am
anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america.
12:57 am
al jazeera america gives you the total news experience anytime, anywhere. more on every screen. digital, mobile, social. visit aljazeera.com. follow @ajam on twitter. and like aljazeera america on facebook for more stories, more access, more conversations. so you don't just stay on top of
12:58 am
the news, go deeper and get more perspectives on every issue. al jazeera america. >> no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists >> welcome to aljazeera america, here are the top stories we're following at this hour of the thousands of government protesters are still battling in the streets of the
12:59 am
ukraine. the demonstrations turned violent on sunday after peaceful protests. and now the protesters are acting out against new anti-riot laws specifically. >> police in russia are hunting for potential suicide bombers in sochi just days before the winter games. a jihaddist widow may have already infiltrated it the city. the united nations withdrew its professional invitation to iran, and they said they will attend. two talks began wednesday in switzerland. nebraska officials are investigating an explosion at an agriculture plant in omaha that killed two people. and dozens were injured. part of the building collapsed after. they believe that everyone is accounted for inside of the building. at least 138 educators in
1:00 am
philadelphia are under investigation for their alleged involvement in cheating. allegations were made after unusual patterns appeared in test scores. those are your headlines at this hour. chris christie facing new accusations of playing hardball. did his office play politics with hurricane relief money? >> olympics. >> american celebrates martin luther king. what would he make of the state of civil rights. >> president obama says marijuana is not worse than alcohol, but pop is a schedule 1 drug. is he sending a mixed message? >> i'm antonio mora, welcome to "consider this".

65 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on